If you work in the natural products industry you probably know that the non-GMO category is growing and retailers are responding by stocking an increasing array of non-GMO certified products. In fact, Whole Foods Market recently announced that by 2018 products containing GMOs as ingredients will require special labels in all stores.

If you work in the natural products industry you probably know that the non-GMO category is growing and retailers are responding by stocking an increasing array of non-GMO certified products. In fact, Whole Foods Market recently announced that by 2018 products containing GMOs as ingredients will require special labels in all stores.

And in July 2016 Vermont’s GMO labeling law will go into affect requiring many products sold in the state to carry a label disclosing whether they are produced, or partially produced, with genetically engineered ingredients. But this doesn’t apply to dietary supplements.

There’s no denying, non-GMO is a hot topic, and a hot seller, but exactly how do dietary supplements fit in with all this? What does it take to produce a truly non-GMO certified dietary supplement?

“There’s a lot that goes into non-GMO validation”, said Conor Mulroney, R&D Special Projects Manager at Source Naturals and Planetary Herbals. “The supplement industry faces a lot of challenges in trying to meet any real criteria that customers expect,” he added.

The road to declaring a dietary supplement GMO-free can be very complex. For example, some very common supplement ingredients may contain genetically modified elements such as GM corn, which serves as the fermentation medium for some vitamin C’s. Genetically modified soy oil yields vitamin E used in some dietary supplements, and several B vitamins may be manufactured with genetically altered microorganisms.

Additionally, many dietary supplements use ingredients from all over the world where language barriers may exist and trade secrets may be held close. And perhaps most important, requirements for non-GMO certification often vary country-by-country. India, China, Europe, America we all have different requirements for non-GMO certified status.

Plus, many dietary supplements often contain ingredients manufactured via a multilayer processes which may use a range of solvents, fillers, binders and excipients all with varying degrees of a possible GM presence.

Manufacturers Respond Supplement manufacturers are responding to the increasing interest in non-GMO products by pursuing various certification options, as well as by self-regulating with the development of company non-GMO criteria and policies.

The most popular agency offering support for verification is the Non-GMO Project. The Project helps coordinate the verification process and contracts out to other companies doing...Read more.

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Adulteration has been around as long as commerce has been around. This is true for many industries including the commerce of botanical ingredients. Therefore, it behooves the retailer of botanical dietary supplements to understand the issues surrounding adulteration to help assure they are only stocking quality products.

According to the Merriam-Webster Dictionary®, adulterated means to corrupt, debase or make impure by the addition of a foreign or inferior substance or element, especially to prepare for sale by replacing more valuable with less valuable or inert ingredients.

To many, it may appear like cases of adulterated ingredients are increasing but this may, or may not, actually be the case. Two primary factors affect this phenomena. First off, the temptation to knowingly, or unwittingly, use adulterated ingredients increases as prices increase. It’s called economically motivated adulteration (EMA). But at the same time, after the passage of DSHEA* and the implementation of strict assessment procedures, many supplement manufacturers are realizing that the botanical materials they used to accept, no longer pass the current Good Manufacturing Practices (cGMP’s). Some of the ingredients that were previously accepted, once they are put through the rigors of the current assessment procedures, may not met the new standards.

“In my experience, GMPs have simply uncovered what was already there. At the same time, often the tests used to make headlines are not valid for the findings they report, such as those issued by the NY Attorney General or many of the findings of so-called consumer organizations,” according to Roy Upton, RH, DipAyu, Executive Director of the American Herbal Pharmacopoeia and Planetary Herbals.

Either way, whether there are more or less adulterated ingredients in the marketplace today, it’s prudent to know how to avoid them. And if you’re a vitamin retailer, learning to assure you only stock quality products, is critical. So, what’s the vitamin retailer to do? Investigate a little deeper, beyond the marketing materials, and ask questions...Read more.


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Topics include:

Learn Natural, Gentle Ways to Cleanse & Detox

Supplemental Solutions for Healthy Lungs

Nourish Your Nervous System with Botanicals

Botanical Adulterants Overview with Special Guest, Roy Upton

Contact: julie@NaturalCommunityReview.com


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